Good Core Training Takes More than Ab Exercises

Good Core Training Takes More than Ab Exercises

Core conditioning and abdominal conditioning have become synonymous in recent years, but the abdominal muscles alone are over-rated when it comes to real core strength or conditioning. In reality, the abdominal muscles have a very limited and specific action. The "core" actually consists of many different muscles that stabilize the spine and pelvis and run the entire length of the torso. These muscles stabilize the spine, pelvis and shoulder and provide a solid foundation for movement in the extremities. Core conditioning exercise programs need to target all these muscle groups to be effective. The muscles of the core make it possible to stand upright and move on two feet. These muscles help control movements, transfer energy, shift body weight and move in any direction. A strong core distributes the stresses of weight-bearing and protects the back.

The most well-known and prominent abdominal muscle is the rectus abdominis. It is the long, flat muscle that extends vertically between the pubis and the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs.

The next groups of muscles that make up the abdominals are the external oblique muscles. This pair of muscles is located on each side of the rectus abdominis. The muscle fibers of the external obliques run diagonally downward and inward from the lower ribs to the pelvis, forming the letter V. You can locate them by putting your hands in your coat pocket.

The internal oblique muscles are a pair of deep muscles that exist just below the external oblique muscles. The internal and external obliques are at right angles to each other.

The deepest layer of abdominal muscles is called the "transversus abdominis." The transverse abdominal muscle wraps around the torso from front to back and from the ribs to the pelvis. The muscle fibers of the transversus abdominis run horizontally, similar to a corset or a weight belt. 

This muscle doesn't help move the spine or the pelvis, but it does help with respiration and breathing. This muscle helps facilitate forceful expiration of air from the lungs, stabilizes the spine and helps compress the internal organs.

Assessments

Forms

Questionnaires

Core Function
Assessing Pelvic tilt and lordosis
R.O.M Assessment
Program Design
R.O.M Assessment for  The Back
7 Days Diet Plan
Agreement For Personal Training Services
Fitter Ball Chart
Exercise Program Form
Physician release form 
Health History Questions
Questionnaire 
Personal Wellness Goals Form 
Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire
Informed Consent Form For Physical Fitness Program
Metabolic Typing QUestionnaire